Friday, August 4, 2017

-the blaze.
Sixth grader Phil Mick experienced such terrible bullying at school that he told his mother he had contemplated suicide. But when she told her friend, the director of United Motorcycle Enthusiasts, about it, he put the call out and dozens of bikers responded.
Brent Warfield organizes charity events in northeastern Indiana, and wanted to highlight the fight against bullying and teen suicide.
He posted about Mick on his Facebook page and asked if some bikers could show up to escort him on his first day returning to school.
Dozens came from as far as an hour away to help Mick and put the spotlight on bullying.

More than 50 bikers showed up to breakfast with Mick and his mother on the first day of school at Dekalb Middle School. They prayed together, and then escorted him to his fresh start at the school.
“We want to get our message out there that we are here for our youth. They are not alone,” Warfield told a local news station.
The group also bought him school supplies and new clothing to encourage him.
“Phil got his 1st ride on a motorcycle to school,” Warfield said in a follow up Facebook post. “We had a amazing turn out. The Motorcycle Community has come together to help stand up against bullying and show our support for those that are getting bullied. We would like to see programs with speakers go to schools and discuss bullying.”
“I got a guardian angel watching over me,” Mick told reporters.
The United Motorcycle Enthusiasts are planning a ride on September 23 to raise awareness of suicide and teen bullying.


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